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Talmud Study

Talmud Study

This is an early feminist painting depicting an open Talmud with a woman's pair of glasses resting on it. Miriam began examining the tension between the women’s liberation movement and the teachings and rituals of Judaism in the eighties.
34" H x 60" W

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Business Trip

Business Trip

This is an early feminist painting depicting an open suitcase with women's attire packed in. Miriam included a siddur, tallit and tefillin along with all the other essentials. Miriam began examining the tension between the women’s liberation movement and the teachings and rituals of Judaism in the eighties.
48" H x 48" W

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Big Hair

Big Hair

This print is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
30" H x 21" W

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Shiksa Arml

Shiksa Arml

This print is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
Option # 2
$0.00    
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Dresses in the Woods

Dresses in the Woods

This print is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
15" H x 21" W

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Shaytl Composition II

Shaytl Composition II

This painting is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
36" H x 48" W

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100% Natural Fiber

100% Natural Fiber

This painting is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
22" H x 18" W

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Time Line

Time Line

This painting is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
36" H x 48" W

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Find Miriam

Find Miriam

This painting is part of a series about tzniut (modesty). In this series Miriam's work conveys the discord she feels between religious convention and secular modernity. These paintings and prints question the tradition of covering the hair, often by wearing wigs, and the dress codes rigidly enforcing female modesty.
36" H x 78" W

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Esther

Esther

For a project called “Ushpizot,” a Hebrew word meaning guests, Miriam made important conceptual as well as visual leaps. Traditionally men are the seven "guests" invited into the Sukkah on the holiday of Sukkot. Using seven household objects she painted images of things traditionally associated with matriarchs in the Bible: Sarah, Rebecca, Leah, Rachel, Miriam, Deborah, and Esther. She attached found objects like toys, dolls, slippers, birth control pills, and fabric to the objects.

SOLD
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Sarah

Sarah

For a project called “Ushpizot,” a Hebrew word meaning guests, Miriam made important conceptual as well as visual leaps. Traditionally men are the seven "guests" invited into the Sukkah on the holiday of Sukkot. Using seven household objects she painted images of things traditionally associated with matriarchs in the Bible: Sarah, Rebecca, Leah, Rachel, Miriam, Deborah, and Esther. She attached found objects like toys, dolls, slippers, birth control pills, and fabric to the objects.

SOLD
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Ezrat Nashim

Ezrat Nashim

This print was the inspiration for the installation Ezrat Nashim. Ezrat Nashim is the Hebrew term for the section in Orthodox synagogues designated for women. Channeling a young girl’s enchantment with paper dolls, Stern cut life-sized silhouettes of female friends out of di-bond panels and covered one side with photographic images of the partitions (mechizot) that separated the men from the women. The other sides were hand-painted with symbolic portraits of each woman. When installed, the silhouettes were arranged in the corner of a dimly lit room and a quiet soundtrack of women’s voices whispered Hallel—the prayer that is recited on holidays and in the morning of each new month.
15" H x 22" W

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Ezrat Nashim (Installation View)

Ezrat Nashim (Installation View)

Ezrat Nashim. Ezrat Nashim is the Hebrew term for the section in Orthodox synagogues designated for women. Channeling a young girl’s enchantment with paper dolls, Stern cut life-sized silhouettes of female friends out of di-bond panels and covered one side with photographic images of the partitions (mechizot) that separated the men from the women. The other sides were hand-painted with symbolic portraits of each woman. When installed, the silhouettes were arranged in the corner of a dimly lit room and a quiet soundtrack of women’s voices whispered Hallel—the prayer that is recited on holidays and in the morning of each new month.
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Judy, Miri, Menorah (Reverse)

Judy, Miri, Menorah (Reverse)

Ezrat Nashim. Ezrat Nashim is the Hebrew term for the section in Orthodox synagogues designated for women. Channeling a young girl’s enchantment with paper dolls, Stern cut life-sized silhouettes of female friends out of di-bond panels and covered one side with photographic images of the partitions (mechizot) that separated the men from the women. The other sides were hand-painted with symbolic portraits of each woman. When installed, the silhouettes were arranged in the corner of a dimly lit room and a quiet soundtrack of women’s voices whispered Hallel—the prayer that is recited on holidays and in the morning of each new month.
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Anita (Reverse)

Anita (Reverse)

Ezrat Nashim. Ezrat Nashim is the Hebrew term for the section in Orthodox synagogues designated for women. Channeling a young girl’s enchantment with paper dolls, Stern cut life-sized silhouettes of female friends out of di-bond panels and covered one side with photographic images of the partitions (mechizot) that separated the men from the women. The other sides were hand-painted with symbolic portraits of each woman. When installed, the silhouettes were arranged in the corner of a dimly lit room and a quiet soundtrack of women’s voices whispered Hallel—the prayer that is recited on holidays and in the morning of each new month.
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Peppi, Miriam, Cheryl (Reverse)

Peppi, Miriam, Cheryl (Reverse)

Ezrat Nashim. Ezrat Nashim is the Hebrew term for the section in Orthodox synagogues designated for women. Channeling a young girl’s enchantment with paper dolls, Stern cut life-sized silhouettes of female friends out of di-bond panels and covered one side with photographic images of the partitions (mechizot) that separated the men from the women. The other sides were hand-painted with symbolic portraits of each woman. When installed, the silhouettes were arranged in the corner of a dimly lit room and a quiet soundtrack of women’s voices whispered Hallel—the prayer that is recited on holidays and in the morning of each new month.
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Miriam H. (Reverse)

Miriam H. (Reverse)

Ezrat Nashim. Ezrat Nashim is the Hebrew term for the section in Orthodox synagogues designated for women. Channeling a young girl’s enchantment with paper dolls, Stern cut life-sized silhouettes of female friends out of di-bond panels and covered one side with photographic images of the partitions (mechizot) that separated the men from the women. The other sides were hand-painted with symbolic portraits of each woman. When installed, the silhouettes were arranged in the corner of a dimly lit room and a quiet soundtrack of women’s voices whispered Hallel—the prayer that is recited on holidays and in the morning of each new month.
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Be The Tenth (Online Interactive Website)

Be The Tenth (Online Interactive Website)

In 2009 Miriam created an online interactive website after her mother died targeted the Kaddish—that is, the prayer that a Jew, along with nine others, recites three times a day for a year after a parent passes away. In the most traditional synagogues, this group (known as a minyan) comprises ten men; women are excluded. In less conservative branches of Judaism, the involvement of women varies. Thus, Stern developed an interactive online project, BeTheTenth.com. There were nine participants and the viewer became the tenth. Some minyanim had mechizot (separations between men and women) and some did not. Some were for women only and some for men only. A recording of the kaddish played. Viewers were invited to choose their preferred minyan and recite the Kaddish with the rest.

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V'At Alit Al Kulana (Installation)

V'At Alit Al Kulana (Installation)

Having grown up in the Orthodox community, Miriam was struck by the fact that women in that community never get a chance to see the Torah, the most holy Jewish document, up close or touch it. Accordingly, when Miriam visited four of the oldest synagogues in Jerusalem’s Old City with her husband, they secretly measured the distances from the women’s section to the ark where the Torahs are kept. She then created an installation attaching strands of lace trimming of the distances to a wall. The lace also reference the partitions that divide men from women in an Orthodox synagogue. In addition a photograph of Miriam holding a torah at the measured distance was taken for each synagogue. A brass plaque naming the synagogue and the distance was displayed.
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V'At Alit Al Kulana (Installation View)

V'At Alit Al Kulana (Installation View)

Having grown up in the Orthodox community, Miriam was struck by the fact that women in that community never get a chance to see the Torah, the most holy Jewish document, up close or touch it. Accordingly, when Miriam visited four of the oldest synagogues in Jerusalem’s Old City with her husband, they secretly measured the distances from the women’s section to the ark where the Torahs are kept. She then created an installation attaching strands of lace trimming of the distances to a wall. The lace also reference the partitions that divide men from women in an Orthodox synagogue. In addition a photograph of Miriam holding a torah at the measured distance was taken for each synagogue. A brass plaque naming the synagogue and the distance was displayed.
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Shaw & Stern

Shaw & Stern

In the summer of 2015 Miriam visited Mass MOCA and saw an exhibition by Jim Shaw. Shaw fabricated wigs for several pieces, outrageous wigs that appeared in paintings and sculptures. Miriam “collaborated” with Jim Shaw using photos of his work with images from an old series she had done before. Shaw uses wigs as symbols of authority and wealth worn throughout European history. For Miriam the transformation of who we are when we wear wigs not only changes our faces but goes much deeper. In the original series she explored how wigs and clothing (worn by religious women as a sign of modesty) change not only a woman’s appearance but also her personality, self-conception, and world view. These more extreme images of women in wigs and weird hairdos add elements of humor, fright, fun, and the ridiculous. However, the questions Miriam raised years ago still resonate. What do these hairdos hide or disclose about the women who wear them?
22" H x 15" W
Price: $1,000.00    
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Shaw & Stern III

Shaw & Stern III

In the summer of 2015 Miriam visited Mass MOCA and saw an exhibition by Jim Shaw. Shaw fabricated wigs for several pieces, outrageous wigs that appeared in paintings and sculptures. Miriam “collaborated” with Jim Shaw using photos of his work with images from an old series she had done before. Shaw uses wigs as symbols of authority and wealth worn throughout European history. For Miriam the transformation of who we are when we wear wigs not only changes our faces but goes much deeper. In the original series she explored how wigs and clothing (worn by religious women as a sign of modesty) change not only a woman’s appearance but also her personality, self-conception, and world view. These more extreme images of women in wigs and weird hairdos add elements of humor, fright, fun, and the ridiculous. However, the questions Miriam raised years ago still resonate. What do these hairdos hide or disclose about the women who wear them?
15" H x 22" W
Price: $1,000.00    
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Shaw & Stern IV

Shaw & Stern IV

In the summer of 2015 Miriam visited Mass MOCA and saw an exhibition by Jim Shaw. Shaw fabricated wigs for several pieces, outrageous wigs that appeared in paintings and sculptures. Miriam “collaborated” with Jim Shaw using photos of his work with images from an old series she had done before. Shaw uses wigs as symbols of authority and wealth worn throughout European history. For Miriam the transformation of who we are when we wear wigs not only changes our faces but goes much deeper. In the original series she explored how wigs and clothing (worn by religious women as a sign of modesty) change not only a woman’s appearance but also her personality, self-conception, and world view. These more extreme images of women in wigs and weird hairdos add elements of humor, fright, fun, and the ridiculous. However, the questions Miriam raised years ago still resonate. What do these hairdos hide or disclose about the women who wear them?
15" H x 22" W
Price: $1,000.00    
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Shaw & Stern V

Shaw & Stern V

In the summer of 2015 Miriam visited Mass MOCA and saw an exhibition by Jim Shaw. Shaw fabricated wigs for several pieces, outrageous wigs that appeared in paintings and sculptures. Miriam “collaborated” with Jim Shaw using photos of his work with images from an old series she had done before. Shaw uses wigs as symbols of authority and wealth worn throughout European history. For Miriam the transformation of who we are when we wear wigs not only changes our faces but goes much deeper. In the original series she explored how wigs and clothing (worn by religious women as a sign of modesty) change not only a woman’s appearance but also her personality, self-conception, and world view. These more extreme images of women in wigs and weird hairdos add elements of humor, fright, fun, and the ridiculous. However, the questions Miriam raised years ago still resonate. What do these hairdos hide or disclose about the women who wear them?
22" H x 30" W
Price: $1,500.00    
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Paper Doll (Tzniut Series)

Paper Doll (Tzniut Series)

Tzniut is a Hebrew word that means modesty. When used in connection with women, it is usually understood to mean “physical modesty.” In contemporary times a woman observing the practice of tzniut is also one who wears sleeves and skirts that cover most of her body. Yet Miriam believes tzniut has layers of meaning beyond the physical. It is these layers of meaning and the questions they provoke that this series probes.

How we feel about ourselves when we dress a certain way, and how do others perceive us. What do “modest” clothes reveal or mask? Does tzniut have value today, and what can we learn from its observance?

Using images of models and pop stars whose usual manor of dress would not qualify as tzniut, helps Miriam bring some of these questions to the fore. Does covering up the body with long sleeves and skirts make you a modest person? What else is needed? And, is this something to strive for?
22" H x 15" W
Price: $1,000.00    
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Celebrity Showcase (Tzniut Series)

Celebrity Showcase (Tzniut Series)

Tzniut is a Hebrew word that means modesty. When used in connection with women, it is usually understood to mean “physical modesty.” In contemporary times a woman observing the practice of tzniut is also one who wears sleeves and skirts that cover most of her body. Yet Miriam believes tzniut has layers of meaning beyond the physical. It is these layers of meaning and the questions they provoke that this series probes.

How we feel about ourselves when we dress a certain way, and how do others perceive us. What do “modest” clothes reveal or mask? Does tzniut have value today, and what can we learn from its observance?

Using images of models and pop stars whose usual manor of dress would not qualify as tzniut, helps Miriam bring some of these questions to the fore. Does covering up the body with long sleeves and skirts make you a modest person? What else is needed? And, is this something to strive for?
15" H x 22" W
Price: $1,000.00    
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Tznius Police (Tzniut Series)

Tznius Police (Tzniut Series)

Tzniut is a Hebrew word that means modesty. When used in connection with women, it is usually understood to mean “physical modesty.” In contemporary times a woman observing the practice of tzniut is also one who wears sleeves and skirts that cover most of her body. Yet Miriam believes tzniut has layers of meaning beyond the physical. It is these layers of meaning and the questions they provoke that this series probes.

How we feel about ourselves when we dress a certain way, and how do others perceive us. What do “modest” clothes reveal or mask? Does tzniut have value today, and what can we learn from its observance?

Using images of models and pop stars whose usual manor of dress would not qualify as tzniut, helps Miriam bring some of these questions to the fore. Does covering up the body with long sleeves and skirts make you a modest person? What else is needed? And, is this something to strive for?
22" H x 30" W
Price: $1,500.00    
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Tznius Princess (Tzniut Series)

Tznius Princess (Tzniut Series)

Tzniut is a Hebrew word that means modesty. When used in connection with women, it is usually understood to mean “physical modesty.” In contemporary times a woman observing the practice of tzniut is also one who wears sleeves and skirts that cover most of her body. Yet Miriam believes tzniut has layers of meaning beyond the physical. It is these layers of meaning and the questions they provoke that this series probes.

How we feel about ourselves when we dress a certain way, and how do others perceive us. What do “modest” clothes reveal or mask? Does tzniut have value today, and what can we learn from its observance?

Using images of models and pop stars whose usual manor of dress would not qualify as tzniut, helps Miriam bring some of these questions to the fore. Does covering up the body with long sleeves and skirts make you a modest person? What else is needed? And, is this something to strive for?
22" H x 30" W
Price: $1,500.00    
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Ezrat Nashim Revisited

Ezrat Nashim Revisited

Miriam reconfigured elements from an older series to create this collage.
22" H x 15" W
Price: $1,000.00    
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Nashim

Nashim

Miriam reconfigured elements from an older series to create this collage.
22" H x 30" W
Price: $1,500.00    

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